HISTORY OF THE TEN MILE RIVER SCOUT CAMPS (CONTINUED)

HISTORY OF THE TEN MILE RIVER SCOUT CAMPS (CONTINUED)

POTENTIAL NATIONAL JAMBOREE SITE


When Camp Kunatah closed, the entire section of T.M.R. below Route 23 was unused, except for the climbing station on Indian Cliffs.

 

In June of 2008, National Council, B.S.A. announced that local councils interested in permanently hosting the National Scout Jamboree should submit proposals. Requirements included 5,000 acres to be donated or leased for 100 years, water, natural beauty, transportation, ability to also host World Jamborees, and use as a B.S.A. high adventure/training center in non-jamboree years.

 

The Greater New York Councils submitted a proposal for the land below Route 23, including a detailed map suggesting how the site would be developed. The main camp would be located between Davis Lake and Rock Lake, with activity areas along the Delaware River, elsewhere on the property and a huge amphitheater at the north end of Rock Lake. It was thought that very few B.S.A. Councils could provide the required 5,000 acres and compete with the G.N.Y.C. proposal. Eventually, the search expanded to non-B.S.A. properties and a site in West Virginia was selected and announced by the B.S.A. in November of 2009.


JACK RUDIN DONATION


In 2008, the Greater New York Councils announced a $1 million donation by real estate developer and longtime Board member Jack Rudin, for improvement of camp facilities, mostly at T.M.R. The most significant construction took place at Camp Keowa, which Mr. Rudin served as a staff member in the 1930s when it was Camp Manhattan. From 2008-2011 the Jack Rudin donation paid for Camp Keowa improvements, including a new waterfront, trading post, provisional campsite and an amphitheater.


ACQUISITION OF LANDMARK CAMP BUILDINGS BY THE T.M.R. SCOUT MUSEUM


In 2010, under the leadership of Museum Trustee John Romanovich, the T.M.R. Scout Museum started moving landmark buildings from long-closed T.M.R. camps to the Museum grounds. The buildings were then restored and used for display or storage purposes. In May of 2010, the Kernochan Blockhouse, longtime symbol of Camp Kernochan, was moved to the Museum. In November of 2010, the Cayuga/ Kotohke Cabin, the last standing remnant of the Brooklyn Scout Camps was also moved. Plans are to move the Jerry Reamer/Kunatah Trading Post to the Museum in 2012.


INCREASING CAMP ATTENDANCE


In 2011, summer camp attendance at T.M.R. jumped by 23%, due to strong increases in participation by both out-of-council and G.N.Y.C. Troops, the largest such increase in at least the previous 15 years.  Total camp attendance maintained roughly the same numbers for 2012 & 2013.

BILLY & KEITH JOHNSON SCOUT PROGRAM CENTER

 

In 2014, NY Jets owner Woody Johnson made a substantial donation to underwrite the construction of the Billy & Keith Johnson Scout Program Center at Camp Aquehonga, broadening the number of merit badges being offered and improving the food service and administrative function of the camp. This gift also enabled the former services building to be reconfigured as the Trade Skills Center – offering Auto Mechanics, Plumbing and Welding Merit Badges and the former camp office to be reconfigured as the Nature/Environmental Sustainability Center.

Reservation-wide expansion of program included the establishment of the LEAF program for first time campers and the ATV program providing high adventure programming for older Scouts.

 

The Aquehonga Alumni continued their work to improve the facilities and program areas, including the Bowman amphitheater, field sports, staff dining, Scoutcraft, Trade Skills and Aquatic areas.

© 2019 Ten Mile River Scout Museum.

Ten Mile River Scout Museum

1481 County Road 26

Narrowsburg, NY  12764

845-252-2063